Archive for the ‘Things I Eat’ Category

When I was a child, the advent of crisp autumn weather meant our free time was spent at my grandparents’ Annapolis Valley farm. The smell of hay and damp, dew-covered grass mingled with the salty breeze blowing across the Minas Basin and the heady ambrosia of ripening apples. The sun low in the sky, touched the brow of the North Mountain, frosting the fields and trees with a warm, golden glow.

While the adults worked, my brother and I would play — exploring the barn, hide and seek in the orchard, clambering amidst the apple bins. The autumns of my childhood are framed by the sides of an old red wooden barn and shadowed around the edges by dust motes dancing in sunshine.

The Gravenstein is an old apple variety. It was discovered in Gråsten, Denmark, in 1669 — a lovely accident of nature that someone chose to nurture, a chance seedling that proved to have qualities worth cultivating. Introduced to Nova Scotia in the early 1800’s by Charles Prescott, who planted them at his estate in Starr’s Point, Kings County, it became popular, and was planted in orchards from one end of the Valley to the other. The apple that Prescott introduced was green with red streaks. The ones currently found in most roadside stands in the valley are of the crimson persuasion, the earliest strain of which was discovered in 1876, in Waterville.

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This recipe now lives at: http://melissadimock.com/blog/2013/10/12/recipe-boiled-onions

 

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Sweet potatoes have a lot going for them. They store well and they’re easy to prepare. They are also rich in anti-oxidants, iron, magnesium, and vitamins (including B6, C and D) — a number of these being known “stress busters”, so is it any wonder this curry is becoming a favorite comfort food?

A dear friend recently gifted me a Sri Lankan cookbook containing a recipe for squash curry, and I used it as a jumping off point for this rich, zesty sweet potato curry:

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This is a family favorite and a cinch to double or triple if you want to make extras. (If making to freeze or can, though, add the uncooked orzo to the soup just before packaging to avoid it turning to mush!) Don’t be put off by the seasoning — it really works!

Meatball Orzo Soup

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